RSS

Tag Archives: Contemporary fiction

Finding Audrey by Sophie Kinsella

23305614Finding Audrey

Fourteen-year-old Audrey has had a traumatic past few months. She’s left school due to a bullying incident, one that left her hospitalized and living with an anxiety disorder. She wears dark glasses, can’t leave the house except to visit her therapist, and reacts badly to everyone else except her family. In trying to get better, Audrey begins a film project where she has to view her family in their ordinary life and in so doing starts to tell her own story. Her brother Frank is a gamer, her mum is obsessed with the Daily Mail and convinced something is wrong with Frank and his computer games, her father is sweet but dragged along with her mother’s hysteria and her little brother Felix is a typical preschooler–one minute loving and delighted with the world and the next minute a demanding little dictator. When Audrey’s therapist Dr. Sarah tells Audrey she needs to make more effort in contact with others, Audrey begins to talk to Linus, her brother’s best friend, and she finds him to be a real friend who understands some of her “lizard brain” symptoms, the description she uses for her ‘flight’ response and anti-social reactions. Through her relationship with Linus and at Dr. Sarah’s direction, Audrey begins to really gain momentum in her recovery and understand how to cope with her extreme anxiety, making this an inspiring and relatable story for any tween or teen.

I listened to this book on audio and it was hilarious. Spectacular audio acting job. Audrey’s mum sounds just like a more hysterical Molly Weasley. The characters are well-drawn and real-to-life, though the romance between Linus and Audrey is a bit too predictable. This book will appeal to both teens and tweens and depicts dealing with a mental disorder with frankness and careful consideration. The one downside is we never discover the real scenario where Audrey was bullied or see her in her new future. Otherwise, readers will find this refreshing, real, and delightful.

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Season by Jonah Lisa Dyer and Stephen Dyer

25094429The Season

In a fun twist on the classic Pride and Prejudice tale, The Season follows Megan McKnight as she is reluctantly drawn into a debutante ball to please tradition and her mother. All Megan wants to do is play soccer, but since she thinks her parents might be fighting about their ranch and pressures to sell, she agrees. Megan must go through a series of events in a month designed to teach her how to be a debutante and act like a lady to best show herself off for her family and to young men with the best pedigrees looking for wives. However, Megan is not your typical Southern belle, unlike her twin sister Julia. She’s got attitude and determination, and this gets her into some trouble. Megan has to learn to be the perfect debutante also while avoiding the drama and scandal from other contestants, but when she meets Hank Waterhouse and her sister has an upset, Megan must set things right for her family, or they could even lose all of their futures.

Recently this novel has been optioned for film! This is sure to be a hit, rather similar to She’s the Man. I’m pretty excited to watch that when it comes out. It’s funny, unique, engaging, and sure to tempt girls who like sports as well as those who like traditional romance and contemporary/realistic fiction. You’ll be surprised at how the book fits in with the Pride and Prejudice tale, but I really enjoyed it! There’s some sex and alcohol mentioned. This is also great for teens anticipating going off to college/graduating/leaving home, right on the edge of figuring out their future.

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

coverThe Sun Is Also a Star

A 2017 Michael L. Printz Honor Book and highlights Nicola Yoon as the John Steptoe New Talent Award!

Natasha refuses to give up on the day her family is supposed to be deported to Jamaica due to her father’s one DUI, and though she’s been trying to convince immigration officers for months, she’s still trying. Natasha believes in science, in logic, in Observable Facts. She wants to stay in the US and go to college, not leave the only life she’s ever known just because her father made one mistake and her family is undocumented. When the security guard at the immigration office makes her five minutes late for her appointment and she’s missed it, another man gives her a chance, sending her to an appointment with a lawyer to hear of her case. On the way there, she meets Daniel…

Daniel has always been overshadowed by his older brother Charlie, until now when he’s been suspended from college for awhile. His Korean American parents used to hold his brother up as a measurement to gauge how good Daniel was, and now Daniel has an interview for Yale to live up to his family’s expectations and be a doctor. As he’s making his way into the city, his train conductor forces everyone off the train to “go find God” and Daniel decides to make the most of it. When he gets off, he notices a stream of people making their way around a girl, Natasha, on the sidewalk who is completely oblivious and zoned out to her headphones. Daniel follows her into a record store and intervenes in a conflict with her ex-boyfriend and his new girlfriend who is caught shoplifting. When he saves her life a few minutes later, they start and make a deal. Since Natasha believes in science and Daniel is a romantic poet, he challenges her that he can make her fall in love with him scientifically.

This deal results in one day that changes their perceptions, forces them to confront things they never imagined and ultimately shows how powerful love can be if only in a short time and how it can change the future.

I could read this book over and over again! The minute I read it I knew it was something special and not just because of the diversity of the main characters (though that is wonderful) and the story. Nicola Yoon writes beautifully and with such feeling for the backgrounds and possibilities of even the minor characters and shows how the universe around Natasha and Daniel relates into the past and future. I’ve been pushing this book at everyone possible because it really stays with you and is a eye-opening glimpse at the lives of this Korean American family and undocumented immigrant families like Natasha’s. Perfect for fans of Eleanor & Park and for high school age teens and adults.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on March 30, 2017 in Contemporary fiction, Romance, Young Adult/Teen

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

This Is Where It Ends by Marieke Nijkamp

This Is Where It Ends24529123

At a high school in Opportunity, Alabama, the educational day starts normally with an assembly. The perspectives of four teens describe events on this seemingly run-of-the-mill day, but terror strikes as a student begins a shooting spree.

  • Claire was excused from assembly for track practice. When she hears gunshots, none of the track team are able to call for help as their phones are locked back at school. She and her best friend Chris must run for help from the security guard. When they find the security guard dead, they continue running to attempt to find someone who can help and find the police because Claire knows that if she’s trying to do something, she’s attempting to save her little brother who is trapped.
  • Tomas and his best friend Fareed are breaking into the principal’s office to check their permanent records. When they notice no one returning from the assembly and hear gunshots, they are the only few left who can help. They call the police, but Tomas knows he cannot leave his sister to die.
  • Autumn listens to the principal’s speech with her girlfriend Sylv, Tomas’s twin sister, who is nervous about Autumn’s brother returning to school that day. When Tyler shows up, he’s the gunman and she knows he’s looking for them both…

What follows is a heart wrenching, unforgettable story of bravery, love, and hope in the face of a terrible, unthinkable tragedy. A tribute to the loss of those at Columbine, Newtown, and others is delivered in this straightforward novel that will have your heart ripped out and your mind wondering why these devastating events still occur. This cover is so artfully done and representative of this novel. It captures and holds your attention. Another plus with this novel is the diversity of the students and is perfect for #WeNeedDiverseBooks.

Note: This book is exceedingly well-written for the subject and while true to account is not described as graphically, and suitable for a some mature younger readers.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 27, 2016 in Contemporary fiction, Young Adult/Teen

 

Tags: , , , ,

What Light by Jay Asher

Happy Christmas, readers! I’ve been away a bit, but have somehow wrangled some time to write recently! Great news, right?! Here’s a lovely Christmas title full of generosity, hope, and second chances by the author that wrote Thirteen Reasons Why.

51vnabl1eql-_sx330_bo1204203200_What Light

Once a year, Sierra and her family travel from Oregon to California to open their Christmas tree lot, but because the costs are getting too high to open their lot themselves, this will be their last year. For Sierra, this special time means living two lives–one in Oregon with her friends Elizabeth and Rachel and one in California with Heather. However, this year, Sierra meets Caleb, and despite her father’s best efforts to discourage the boys, this one he can’t drive away with a promise of cleaning the outhouses.

As Sierra’s friend Heather warns her, Caleb has something of a reputation. The story goes that he pulled a knife on his sister who no longer lives with him and his mom. Ignoring the gossip but still being cautious, especially when this news makes it to her parents, Sierra can’t reconcile this Caleb with the Caleb she sees buying Christmas trees with his tip money for families who can’t afford it. She notices that he seems to be in pain when the topic of his past is mentioned, and Sierra can’t help but feel the need to help him. As they navigate gossip and judgment, Caleb and Sierra find out that love can create second chances and change everything.

This book is like a sugar cookie, warm from the oven, slowly melting in your mouth. Curl up with this one by the fire tonight (if necessary, a fire on tv) and a cup of hot cocoa or wassail and be happy. After finishing this book, I’ve discovered I love this cover and the message it sends. The Christmas lights? Just look at the cover again once you’re done reading it and see what you notice.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 25, 2016 in Contemporary fiction, Romance, Young Adult/Teen

 

Tags: , , , , ,